Categories
English

Psychology

Assignment 2: LAB: Predicting Traits and Patterns

By the due date, select one of the following topics, complete the activity, and post your conclusions to the Submissions Area on the next page.

1. Individual differences in physiological functioning and behavior.

Read the instructions below. To complete this activity you will have to download the chart, PSY1010_Wk2_Chart3. Make as many copies of the chart as you need. After gathering your data and forming your conclusions, be sure to attach your data charts to your assignment response.

Eysenck has suggested that differences in introversion-extraversion are closely linked to the cortical arousal of the brain’s reticular formation. Extraverts seem to have higher sensory thresholds and less-arousable cortices. One way to tell whether someone is introverted or extraverted is to measure his or her reaction to having pure lemon juice placed on his or her tongue.

For this project, select five friends who are willing to participate. First, administer the Introversion Extraversion Scale (labeled “The Cheek and Buss Scale” to prevent subjects from having preconceived ideas about the purpose; it’s attached at the end so you can get a relatively clean copy), then place a drop of lemon juice on each of their tongues and record their reactions. Monitor for facial expressions as well as verbal reports.

After your subjects have left, score their scale. Never tell your subjects how they scored on a scale; you’re not qualified, and you could damage their self-esteem. Reassure them that their results will be combined with those of all your subjects, and their anonymity is guaranteed.

Scoring the scale:
Reverse the scores for items 3, 6, 9, and 12 (5=1, 4=2, 3=3, 2=4, 1=5).
Add up these reversed scores with all the other scores for that person.
If the score is 40 or above, consider your subject an introvert.
If the score is less than 40, consider your subject an extravert. Did you find that your introverted subjects reacted differently to the lemon juice than your extraverts? What was the difference? Why do you think they reacted differently?  If you found no difference, do you think that Eysenck’s prediction is wrong, or that some other thing is causing your subjects to behave differently than Eysenck predicted they would? Include your data.

2. Hemispheric Specialization

Recruit five friends to participate. You will need a wooden dowel (or broom/mop handle), a timer (preferably a stopwatch), and a list of verbal problems, such as spelling problems (e.g., repeat the alphabet backwards, recite the alphabet forward giving every third letter, spell “Afghanistan” backwards, etc.).

Read the instructions below. To complete this activity you will have to download the chart, PSY1010_Wk2_Chart4. Make as many copies of the chart as you need. After gathering your data and forming your conclusions, be sure to attach your data charts to your assignment response.

Allow each subject five minutes to practice balancing the dowel on his or her right and then left forefingers. Then, begin the eight test trials, four on each hand. Have the subject place the dowel on his or her forefinger (vertically). When you say “Go,” the subject must move his or her supporting hand, and you begin timing the balancing. Stop timing when the dowel is dropped or when it touches any part of the subject’s body. The first four trials (two on each hand) should be conducted in silence, and the second four should include the verbal task. Calculate the mean balancing times for each hand under both the silent and the verbal conditions. Describe the effects of balancing on the subject’s dominant hand, whether the subject was male or female, and whether the verbal task interfered. Explain why you got these results.