Categories
History

Looking for History of Western ART Expert

It is going to be an online midterm, so I’m going to give you the question while I’m taking the test online. Could you help me with that?

 

Categories
English

essay 1 revision

I need to revise my essay letter.

My topic is on the issue ” to serve the people of texas city in taking care of the increased homeless families”

Just see the example and my paper where my mistake are 

just revise on it or you can totaly change the paragraph on your own

just see the rubric or outline

I need pathos, ethos and logos

Categories
History

american revolution

ASSIGNMENT

Write a minimum of 300 words that will argue against the American Revolution as Loyalist or Tory citizens.

Loyalist James Chalmers, under the pseudonym of Candidus, wrote Plain Truth in response to Thomas Paine’s famous pamphlet Common Sense.  You can click on the enclosed link to read Thomas Paine at Gutenberg Project.  Then read the excerpted text from Chalmers below, shaping your statement in support or in opposition to Chalmer’s argument. 

Your submission should be a minimum of 250 words in length.  Try not to make assumptions.  Instead, assume the historical role of someone who lived in the colonies in the period up to, and including, the American Revolution. You could be a Colonial politician, a merchant, a farmer, a shop owner, or even a Southern plantation owner. Be creative.

“I have just heard the news of a small group of ruffians who have dumped a large amount of tea into the Boston Harbor. The initial report was that this group was a roving band of Indians. I refuse to be influenced by the underground rebellious press that continues to feed us with false reports and slanted view points that support a rebellion against the Crown. I and many loyal Colonists have found the truth to this report. The ruffians were actually a group of men , most of them are associated with the secret societv of Masons. The event demonstrates a useless destruction of property against the East India Company. I am writing to inform you that the tea which was destroyed was sent to the Colonies to be sold at a very competitive price as the East India Tea Company has a surplus of tea. King George has authorized the sale of this tea to benefit the Colonies. This tea would have also helped the financial state of the East India Tea Company of which we certainly hope would stay solvent. We have also found information alluding to the tea smuggling operations of John Hancock and other of the rebellion supporters. Could it be that the tea in Boston Harbor was destroyed to prevent competitive pricing of tea? (are we merely changing tax collectors?) Why do we continue to anger King George by useless acts of property damage?

I urge you all to consider the price we would pay for rebellion against the Crown. Some of our Colonists call this revolution but you must realize that this is a huge mistake, any actions against the Crown represent a mere rebellion.[1]

[1] Excerpt taken from: Drake, Allison Stark.  Headlines From History:  The Boston Massacre

     Five Colonists Killed By British Soldiers.  New York:  The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc., 2001

USE AT LEAST 3 IN TEXT CITATIONS

APA 6th ED

No title page

LIST ALL REFERENCES! NO PLAGIARISM!

Categories
History

Assignment 3: Cultural Activity Report

This will be verified through turnitin.com.  

 

Assignment 3: Cultural Activity Report

Due Week 10 and worth 100 points

As a way of experiencing the Humanities beyond your classroom, computer, and textbook, you are asked to do a certain type of “cultural activity” that fits well with our course and then report on your experience. Your instructor will require you to propose an activity and get instructor approval before you do it and report on it (students should look for any instructions in that respect). Every effort should be made to ensure that this is a hands-on experience (not a virtual one), that this activity fits the HUM 111 class well, and that the activity is of sufficient quality for this university course. The two (2) key types of activities are a museum visit or a performance. Note: This must not be a report on the same activity (and certainly not the same report) as done for another class, like HUM 112. For instance, one might go to the same museum as done for HUM 112, but this HUM 111 report will focus on entirely different works and displays.Visit a museum or gallery exhibition or attend a theater or musical performance before the end of Week 10. The activity (museum or performance) should have content that fits our course well. Have fun doing this.Write a two to three (2-3) page report (500-750 words) that describes your experience.Clearly identify the event location, date attended, the attendees, and your initial reaction upon arriving at the event.Provide specific information and a description of at least two (2) pieces (e.g., art, exhibits, music, etc.).Provide a summary of the event and describe your overall reaction after attending the event.Use at least the class text as a reference (additional sources are fine, not necessary unless required by your content). Your report should include connections you make between things observed in your activity and things learned in the course and text.

Note: Submit your cultural activity choice to the instructor for approval before the end of Week 5 (earlier is even better). Look for guidance from the instructor for how or where to make your proposal. You may also seek advice from your instructor (provide your town/state or zip code) for a good activity in your general area.

 

Visiting a MuseumIt makes sense to approach a museum the way a seasoned traveler approaches visiting a city for the first time. Find out what there is available to see. In the museum, find out what sort of exhibitions are currently housed in the museum and start with the exhibits that interest you.If there is a travelling exhibition, it’s always a good idea to see it while you have the chance. Then, if you have time, you can look at other things in the museum.Every effort should be made ahead of time to identify a museum that has items and works one can easily connect to our HUM 111 class and book. Since HUM 111 covers from ancient times to the 1500s AD, it makes more sense to focus on items from that time frame. In general, museums with artistic cultural artifacts and fine arts work better than history museums.Any questions about whether a museum-visit activity fits the course and assignment well enough will be decided by the instructor when the student seeks approval for the activity. Any alternative activity outside the normal ones listed here, such as for those limited by disability or distance, will be determined by the instructor. Generally, we do not expect students to travel over an hour to get to an approved activity.Take notes as you go through the museum and accept any handouts or pamphlets that the museum staff gives you. While you should not quote anything from the printed material when you do your report, the handouts may help to refresh your memory later.The quality of your experience is not measured by the amount of time you spend in the galleries or the number of works of art that you actually see. The most rewarding experiences can come from finding two (2) or three (3) pieces of art or exhibits which intrigue you and then considering those works in leisurely contemplation. Most museums even have benches where you can sit and study a particular piece.If you are having a difficult time deciding which pieces to write about, ask yourself these questions: (1) If the museum you are visiting suddenly caught fire, which two (2) pieces of art or exhibits would you most want to see saved from the fire? (2) Why would you choose those two (2) particular pieces?

 

Attending a PerformanceCheck your local colleges to see if there are any free or low-cost performances or student recitals. Student performances are generally of almost the same quality as professional performances, but typically cost much less. However, performances of high school level or lower will not meet this requirement.A performance that is relevant to a HUM 111 course is more difficult to find than a performance that would be relevant to HUM 112 (which covers from 1600 to the present). However, our course does cover Shakespeare and Greek tragedy and drama, so any performances of those will work. Note: One can sometimes find music performances of music from the Renaissance or Reformation period, or even earlier.  Any questions about whether a performance activity fits the course and assignment well enough will be decided by the instructor when the student seeks approval for an activity. Any alternative activity outside the normal ones listed here, such as for those limited by disability or distance, will be determined by the instructor. Generally, we do not expect students to travel over an hour to get to an approved activity.Unlike visiting a museum, where you can wear almost anything, people attending performances are often expected to “dress up” a bit.Take a pen or pencil with you and accept the program you are offered by the usher; you will probably want to take notes on it during or after the performance.Turn off your cell phone before entering the auditorium. Do not use your phone to record the music or to take pictures or videos. To play it safe, turn the phone off.Most long musical performances have at least one (1) intermission. If the lights start blinking, it is a sign that the performance is about to begin.Look for very specific things (such as a particular piece of music or the way certain instruments sounded at a specific time) which tend to stand out as either enjoyable or not enjoyable. Be sure to take notes of the things which you find enjoyable as well as the things which are not enjoyable.

 

If a student is unable to attend a cultural event in person due to circumstances beyond the student’s control, then the instructor will recommend an alternate event / activity for the student to “attend” online. The “virtual” event / activity is usually only for students who, due to their physical location, cannot possibly attend an event / activity in person; typically, these students are stationed overseas or have no means of transportation. Experience shows most museums and activities are modest in cost and manageable for students, and you will often see students from other universities there on similar course projects. If you are facing financial hardship, keep in mind that many museums have a free day each week and performance discounts are often available for students and veterans, among others. Feel free to ask your instructor to help with finding low-cost options. If you believe that you have a legitimate reason for attending a “virtual” activity, you must contact the instructor no later than Week 5 for your request to be considered.

Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements:Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; references must follow APA style format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. (Note: Students can find APA style materials located in the course shell for reference).Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required page length.

The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:Explain the importance of situating a society’s cultural and artistic expressions within a historical context.Examine the influences of intellectual, religious, political, and socio-economic forces on social, cultural, and artistic expressionsUse technology and information resources to research issues in the study of world cultures.Write clearly and concisely about world cultures using proper writing mechanics.

Categories
History

Socratic Dialogue

 

For this assignment you will create a Socratic dialogue. The dialogue will be completed in two parts. The first part will be 1–2 pages of notes to help you generate the arguments and analysis that will become a part of your dialogue in Part II.

Part I Identify a belief. This can be a religious belief, an ethical belief, political belief, or any other one about which reasonable minds can disagree. Beliefs that are held by the vast majority of people (such as a widely accepted scientific fact) are not good choices for this assignment). A good topic will have reasonable evidence and reasoning supporting both sides.Consider other points of view, or counter-arguments. Think about what you find persuasive about these counter-arguments, as well as how you might argue against them. Try to keep an open mind. Remember, we are engaging in philosophical dialogue, not trying to win an argument.Examine the multiple points-of-view and weigh the evidence. Identify any unsupported assumptions or holes in the argument.Consider the consequences of the beliefs presented. Philosophical thinking is an ongoing process, so it is important to identify questions for further thinking and to wonder about factors and circumstances that might change your view about a particular question.

Part II

Using the analysis from Part I, write a 2-page dialogue between Socrates and a person of your choosing (i.e., the Interlocutor) that examines the belief.Have the Interlocutor present the belief and reasons you identified in step 1 of Part I.Have Socrates pose questions that encourage the Interlocutor to consider other points-of-view as well as any problems with their argument, drawing upon the multiple points-of-view you identified in steps 2 and 3 of Part I, as well as the potential consequences of a given position as identified in step 4 of Part I.Make sure your dialogue arrives at a conclusion. Keep in mind that it may be different from the belief or point of view you started with, and could be somewhat open-ended. As you searched for reasons that support your belief or point of view, you may have also come across reasons that challenge your beliefs. Don’t hide from these challenges. Remember, philosophy requires us to examine and even question our beliefs. If you find yourself more persuaded by the other points of view, don’t despair! Unlike a formal debate, the kinds of arguments we make while engaging in philosophical thinking are open to revision. 

Categories
History

History writing

Experiencing the Civil War

How did the outbreak of the Civil War affect different groups of Americans?

The actions of smaller groups of people had a surprisingly large effect on the outcome of this conflict.Select three groups of people and write a 500 or more word, APA style, essay exploring how these groups affected the war itself.  Include a title page.You may choose from farmers, merchants, tradesmen, women, slaves, freed slaves, Native Americans, Frontiersmen, volunteers, plantation-owners, specific religions, or other groups for your argument.Ultimately, how did unexpected efforts in war affect the debate over states’ rights and slavery?

Categories
History

PHILOSOPHY ASSIGNMENT

DUE ASAP

300 WORDS

Categories
History

Letter 8/1

Imagine you are a member of the U.S. militia in the early 1800s.

Choose one of the following events from the War of 1812 in which you took part:Fort McHenryBurning of WashingtonOld Fort NiagaraU.S.S. ConstitutionBattle of New OrleansBattle of the Thames

Write a 350-word letter to a family member explaining the event and its significance to the war’s outcome.

Submit your assignment to the Assignment Files tab.

Categories
History

African American history 5 page research paper

I will upload all details of the paper, please follow acurately 

Categories
History

The Gilded Age: Short Answer Assignment

Please answer the following questions using your readings, the lecture, and the presentation for this week. Responses should be 2-3 complete and grammatically correct sentences at minimum. (10 Points Each)What was Social Darwinism and how did it negatively impact Americans during this period?What were the key elements for industrialization that the United States developed during and after the American Civil War?What was the “New South” and what industries did southern states introduce during the 1880s to 1900?How were the resources and people of the frontier west exploited by the growth of the United States during industrialization?Three years after the western frontier was closed, a “financial panic” set in and lasted until 1897. Why did that panic occur and what were its effects?What were some of the types of responses used by the U.S. government in response to strikes organized by Labor Unions and associated groups?What were some of the laws and policies instituted by the states and the U.S. government that negatively impacted African American civil rights?What was “Nativism” and what did its followers want?How did the new literary genres of Science Fiction and “Rags to Riches” dime novels help determine American cultural attitudes?How did the inventions, entertainments, and literature of the Gilded Age affect American culture?